Before we can tackle the question of to gem or not, we first have to understand what a gem is. That's not something that is totally easy to do, but we will take a high level look at it. Gems are bits of logic, in ruby, that can be "brought in" to do tasks. They are local copies of other projects. Rails it's self is just a compilation of gems. OTher languages have similar things. .Net has DLLs, Java has packages (or JARs), and python has modules. Just about every language used in production today has a method for "sharing logic" between other projects. That is the primary function of a gem. It lets your write a bit of logic one time, maintain it one time, and consume it in many projects. The best analogy that I can think of is your house's air conditioner. If your house was a rails project, the A/C would be a gem. It's an important part of your overall house, but they basically just come in and set the machine down, then "wire it up" with electrical and duct work. Yes it's integrated, and yest it's important, but your builder didn't have to build an air compressor, or air handler, or heat pump by hand from raw materials. He just caller Trane and plugged in their system.

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I came across this question on programmers stack exchange. Basically the user is asking if it is worth writing good clean code, and refactoring code. It's a fair question but it's complicated. As a developer who focuses on clean, well tested code I thought I would take some time to focus on answering this question (and adding a few comments about metrics along the way).

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Simply put the Heartbleed bug (or CVE-2014-0160) is an issue in OpenSSL that exposes "Encrypted data" to someone trying to gain access to private or protected data. For example, credit card information sent between you and a online store, should be encrypted, making it harder for someone other then you or the store to get the information. The Heartbleed bug exposes some of that info (for example).

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I was reading up on a forum for one of the open source projects I support and I came across a few posts that made me think about "what Canonical is doing wrong". However when I really started to think about the real underlining issues, I started to think about the types of Linux users out there. Eventually I came to the opinion that Canonical's main problem is that it is appealing to the wrong segment of Linux users. This led me to the question; "What kind of Linux user are you?" That's the real reason for this article. So I ask you, what kind of Linux user are you. And before you answer with "I don't use Linux." read the article and see where you fit. Chances are you use Linux every day and just don't realize it. If your a client then your probably even paying to use Linux, even if you never login.

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New version of rails, means it’s time again for another article on setting up a production server to run it.

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